Sabotage incident in Swedish nuclear plant - updated

Swedish nuclear suspects released

The nuclear plant accounts for 10% of Sweden's electricity production
Two men arrested on suspicion of attempting to sabotage a nuclear plant in southern Sweden have been released, police say.
Both men were stopped on Wednesday at the entrance to the plant after traces of explosives were found on a bag.
Police said the investigation was continuing, but there were no grounds to hold the men any longer.
The Oskarshamn plant - owned by German energy giant E.On - was shut and sealed off while inspections took place.
The substance found in the bag was believed to be TATP, or triacetone triperoxide, an extremely unstable material which can be made using household chemicals.
TATP was used by the so-called British "shoe bomber" Richard Reid, who planned to blow up an aeroplane in 2001.

Arrests at Swedish nuclear plant

The nuclear plant accounts for 10% of Sweden's electricity production
Two men suspected of attempting to sabotage a nuclear plant in southern Sweden have been arrested, police said.
Both men were stopped at the entrance to the nuclear plant after traces of explosives were found on a bag.
The Oskarshamn plant - owned by German energy giant E.On - has been sealed, the company said.
The substance was believed to be TATP, or triacetone triperoxide, an extremely unstable material which can be made using household chemicals.
TATP was used by the so-called British "shoe bomber" Richard Reid, who planned to blow up an aeroplane in 2001.
Police said they had initially been called by the plant early on Wednesday morning.
"Two men who were taken in for questioning this morning have now been detained on suspicion of preparing for sabotage," Kalmar County Police spokesman Sven-Erik Karlsson told Reuters.
The plant, located on the country's south-eastern coast, has three boiling water reactors which together produce some 10% of Sweden's electricity.

Source: BBC